The Diagnosis and Prognosis theme links the basic science theme to clinical services. There is a strong history of cutting-edge neuropathology research in Southampton which has significantly advanced the field. There are established clinical services in place for evaluation of dementia diagnosis and provision of care. Existing strengths include dementia diagnostic imaging, with an imaging physics department that has expertise in structural and functional imaging, modelling and scientific computing. The neuropsychology team within this theme provide clinical diagnostic support to the region, and have interests in diagnostic test development within a clinical environment.

The group links to clinical dementia services across the region, and offers diagnostic and support services for all types of dementia including young-onset dementia. There are established research cohorts that provide a wealth of clinical, imaging and neuropathological data including prospectively acquired biobank samples. iDeAC has already enhanced the collaborative links within this group across the other themes, and a number of new projects have been initiated via the iDeAC development workshops.

Dr Ian Galea

Dr Ian Galea

Dr Ian Galea is a clinician scientist who is internationally recognised for his work on the blood-brain barrier and haemoglobin neurotoxicity. His group work at the interface of laboratory and clinical medicine, with expertise in scientific measurement in health and disease. Of special interest to dementia researchers is a high-throughput urine test to measure systemic inflammation and a refined imaging method to measure blood-brain barrier permeability of the human brain. He is principal investigator of a study collecting cerebrospinal fluid, serum, urine and brain tissue samples, for use in neurodegenerative disease research.

Sofia Michopoulou

Sofia Michopoulou

Sofia is a principal clinical scientist, one of the medical physics experts (MPE) for nuclear medicine and the deputy lead for nuclear medicine physics. She supports the general nuclear medicine, SPECT/CT and PET/CT services at UHS and leads the introduction of new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.

Dr Rosaleen McCarthy

Dr Rosaleen McCarthy

Professor Rosaleen McCarthy is the lead neuropsychology consultant and head of the neuropsychology department. Her research interests are in disorders of memory as well as in impairments of perception, language and attention. She works with people who have younger onset dementia, cerebra-vascular disease, head injuries, epilepsy and brain tumours. She collaborates with the neurologists in diagnosing complex cases.

Dr Tony Birch

Dr Tony Birch

Dr Tony Birch is a clinical scientist specialising in measurement of fluid flow in the brain. His particular expertise is the application of transcranial Doppler ultrasound to measure the velocity of blood flowing in the major arteries at the base of the brain. As well as performing these measurements as a clinical service, he provides a transcranial Doppler training course for health professionals from across the UK.

Dr Anton Page

Dr Anton Page

Dr Anton Page is the Head of The Biomedical Imaging Unit, a joint University Hospitals Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS)/University of Southampton (UoS) facility for high quality/high resolution diagnostic and research microscopy. Accredited under UKAS to ISO 15189, this core facility carries out research work for UoS, other universities and research institutes, industry and artists, together with diagnostic microscopy for UHS, and other hospitals both nationally and internationally.

Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia. However, people with DLB often experience missed or delayed diagnosis. The Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) system allows research and service improvement work to take place that has previously not been possible, by allowing access to deidentified patient records. In this project we will use CRIS to explore patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies within Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, including duration of disease, mortality and rates of hospital admission. We will also explore early clinical features using Natural Language Processing, in collaboration with other UK centres.

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Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Funded by a recent Transformative Healthcare 2050 award from the EPSRC an interdisciplinary team of Southampton based scientists and researchers are developing new fibre lasers and novel methodologies that will allow early detection, imaging and treatment deep inside tissues up to several millimetres and ultimately up to several centimetres. The imaging process is aimed to be completely non-invasive and non-destructive, whilst providing near instant results. The simplicity and morpho-chemical nature of the imaging without the use of labels means it can be applied to a host of medical areas to deliver diagnostic/prognostic capabilities in an accessible manner. While the initial target is diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis from outside the body, imaging across the skull into the brain to detect early onset of neurodegenerative diseases may also be possible.

read more
Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

As an interdisciplinary team from University Hospital Southampton & University of Southampton comprising specialists in cardiothoracic surgery, ophthalmology, cardiac perfusion, imaging, mathematics and neuroanatomy we are in the optimal position to conduct a study in order to investigate the heart-lung-brain interactions and their effect on the variability of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetised patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and different levels of hypothermia. By systematically and methodically being able to control elements of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function we can isolate the different signals transmitted from the brain blood flow and prove that spontaneous cerebral vasomotion as a key motive force for the clearance of fluid from the brain is present and is initiated in the wall of the cerebral arteries.

read more
Blood-brain barrier integrity in dementia

Blood-brain barrier integrity in dementia

Several studies suggest that blood-brain barrier integrity is impaired in Alzheimer’s dementia. In this project it is hypothesized that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can be used to demonstrate this phenomenon, comparing Alzheimer’s dementia, Lewy body dementia and control individuals. The relationship of blood-brain barrier permeability to systemic inflammatory status as measured by urinary neopterin-to-creatinine ratio and blood cytokine assays is being investigated. Patients are being followed up to determine whether a baseline MRI assessment of blood-brain barrier integrity is predictive of future cognitive decline. The Academic Clinical Fellow working on the project may come from Psychiatry or Neurology backgrounds.

read more
Blood-brain barrier integrity in dementia

Blood-brain barrier integrity in dementia

Several studies suggest that blood-brain barrier integrity is impaired in Alzheimer’s dementia. In this project it is hypothesized that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can be used to demonstrate this phenomenon, comparing Alzheimer’s dementia, Lewy body dementia and control individuals. The relationship of blood-brain barrier permeability to systemic inflammatory status as measured by urinary neopterin-to-creatinine ratio and blood cytokine assays is being investigated. Patients are being followed up to determine whether a baseline MRI assessment of blood-brain barrier integrity is predictive of future cognitive decline. The Academic Clinical Fellow working on the project may come from Psychiatry or Neurology backgrounds.

read more
Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia. However, people with DLB often experience missed or delayed diagnosis. The Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) system allows research and service improvement work to take place that has previously not been possible, by allowing access to deidentified patient records. In this project we will use CRIS to explore patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies within Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, including duration of disease, mortality and rates of hospital admission. We will also explore early clinical features using Natural Language Processing, in collaboration with other UK centres.

read more
Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Funded by a recent Transformative Healthcare 2050 award from the EPSRC an interdisciplinary team of Southampton based scientists and researchers are developing new fibre lasers and novel methodologies that will allow early detection, imaging and treatment deep inside tissues up to several millimetres and ultimately up to several centimetres. The imaging process is aimed to be completely non-invasive and non-destructive, whilst providing near instant results. The simplicity and morpho-chemical nature of the imaging without the use of labels means it can be applied to a host of medical areas to deliver diagnostic/prognostic capabilities in an accessible manner. While the initial target is diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis from outside the body, imaging across the skull into the brain to detect early onset of neurodegenerative diseases may also be possible.

read more
Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

As an interdisciplinary team from University Hospital Southampton & University of Southampton comprising specialists in cardiothoracic surgery, ophthalmology, cardiac perfusion, imaging, mathematics and neuroanatomy we are in the optimal position to conduct a study in order to investigate the heart-lung-brain interactions and their effect on the variability of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetised patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and different levels of hypothermia. By systematically and methodically being able to control elements of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function we can isolate the different signals transmitted from the brain blood flow and prove that spontaneous cerebral vasomotion as a key motive force for the clearance of fluid from the brain is present and is initiated in the wall of the cerebral arteries.

read more

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