Research projects

 – Diagnosis and Prognosis

Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Using electronic patient records to examine patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia. However, people with DLB often experience missed or delayed diagnosis. The Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) system allows research and service improvement work to take place that has previously not been possible, by allowing access to deidentified patient records. In this project we will use CRIS to explore patient outcomes in Dementia with Lewy bodies within Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, including duration of disease, mortality and rates of hospital admission. We will also explore early clinical features using Natural Language Processing, in collaboration with other UK centres.

read more
Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Deep tissue theranostic imaging

Funded by a recent Transformative Healthcare 2050 award from the EPSRC an interdisciplinary team of Southampton based scientists and researchers are developing new fibre lasers and novel methodologies that will allow early detection, imaging and treatment deep inside tissues up to several millimetres and ultimately up to several centimetres. The imaging process is aimed to be completely non-invasive and non-destructive, whilst providing near instant results. The simplicity and morpho-chemical nature of the imaging without the use of labels means it can be applied to a host of medical areas to deliver diagnostic/prognostic capabilities in an accessible manner. While the initial target is diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis from outside the body, imaging across the skull into the brain to detect early onset of neurodegenerative diseases may also be possible.

read more
Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

Harnessing the heart-lung-brain interactions in the search for vascular biomarkers for neurological dysfunction

As an interdisciplinary team from University Hospital Southampton & University of Southampton comprising specialists in cardiothoracic surgery, ophthalmology, cardiac perfusion, imaging, mathematics and neuroanatomy we are in the optimal position to conduct a study in order to investigate the heart-lung-brain interactions and their effect on the variability of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetised patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and different levels of hypothermia. By systematically and methodically being able to control elements of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function we can isolate the different signals transmitted from the brain blood flow and prove that spontaneous cerebral vasomotion as a key motive force for the clearance of fluid from the brain is present and is initiated in the wall of the cerebral arteries.

read more